Monday, September 22, 2014     Volume: 15, Issue: 28
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Weekly Poll
Should Santa Maria voters pass Measure T, which would tax homeowners in order to build a new school?

Yes. The schools are overcrowded and we need more classrooms.
No. Santa Maria-Bonita should go back to a year-round system.
No. Taxpayers shouldn't have to fork over any more money.
Couldn't state funding pay to build another school?

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Santa Maria Sun / News

The following article was posted on December 31st, 2013, in the Santa Maria Sun - Volume 14, Issue 43 [ Submit a Story ]
The following articles were printed from Santa Maria Sun [santamariasun.com] - Volume 14, Issue 43

Political Watch 1/2/14

• Three bills authored by Sen. Hannah-Beth Jackson (D-Santa Barbara) took effect on Jan. 1. Senate Bill 400 prevents employers from being able to fire or discriminate against an employee who has been a victim of domestic violence, sexual assault, or stalking. The bill also requires employers to make reasonable efforts to protect the victims from their abuser or stalker, such as changing their telephone number, relocating their desk, or implementing a workplace safety plan. As the bill made its way through the state legislature, a former San Diego-area teacher who made national headlines when she was let go from her teaching job after her abusive ex-husband visited her on school campus, became a proponent of the bill. Senate Bill 510 gives mobile home residents a voice when their mobile home park is being subdivided and sold. Laws allow mobile home park owners to subdivide and sell the individual lots on which homes are place. It’s known as a condo conversion. SB 510 clarifies the law, which often left mobile home park residents without a say in the process. With the new bill, if the majority of mobile home park residents don’t support a sale, local governments are allowed—although not required—to disapprove of the conversion. Senate Bill 340 protects women from harassment and intimidation when they are seeking services at reproductive health care facilities. The bill makes the Reproductive Rights Law Enforcement Act permanent. Because of that act, the attorney general is required to gather information related to anti-reproductive rights crimes and analyze the effectiveness of current laws.