Sunday, September 26, 2021     Volume: 22, Issue: 30
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
A QUIET PLACE PART II
ANOTHER ROUND
BINGEABLE: 100 FOOT WAVE (2021-)
BINGEABLE: BARRY (2018-)
BINGEABLE: CLICKBAIT
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG (2016-2019)
BINGEABLE: SWEET TOOTH
BINGEABLE: TITANS (2018-)
BLACK WIDOW
BLAST FROM THE PAST: CARRIE (1976)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX (1999)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART (1990)
BOSS LEVEL
CANDYMAN
GUILTY PLEASURE: BACHELOR IN PARADISE (2014-)
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
GUILTY PLEASURES: GUNPOWDER MILKSHAKE
GUILTY PLEASURES: JOLT
HAVE A GOOD TRIP: ADVENTURES IN PSYCHEDELICS
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM (1996)
I CARE A LOT
I’M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS
IRRESISTIBLE
LIMBO
MISHA AND THE WOLVES (2021)
NEW FLICKS: BLOOD RED SKY
NEW FLICKS: COPSHOP
NEW FLICKS: CRUELLA
NEW FLICKS: SWEET GIRL
NEW FLICKS: VAL (2021)
NINE DAYS
NO SUDDEN MOVE
PIG
ROADRUNNER: A FILM ABOUT ANTHONY BOURDAIN (2021)
SOUL
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM (2019)
THE CARD COUNTER
THE LAST BLOCKBUSTER (2020)
THE MAP OF TINY PERFECT THINGS
THE NEW MUTANTS
THE PAPER TIGERS
THE PROFESSOR AND THE MADMAN
THE SUNLIT NIGHT
TV REVIEW: A WILDERNESS OF ERROR (2020)
TV REVIEW: BATES MOTEL
TV REVIEW: DEFENDING JACOB
TV REVIEW: EXTERMINATE ALL THE BRUTES (2021)
TV REVIEW: HELL ON WHEELS (2011-2016)
TV REVIEW: HOMECOMING
TV REVIEW: HOW TO WITH JOHN WILSON
TV REVIEW: I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE
TV REVIEW: I MAY DESTROY YOU
TV REVIEW: LENOX HILL
TV REVIEW: LITTLE AMERICA
TV REVIEW: MARE OF EASTTOWN
TV REVIEW: MRS. AMERICA
TV REVIEW: ONE MISSISSIPPI
TV REVIEW: PAINTING WITH JOHN (2021)
TV REVIEW: RAMY
TV REVIEW: RUN
TV REVIEW: SPACE FORCE
TV REVIEW: TABOO
TV REVIEW: TED LASSO (2020-)
TV REVIEW: THE BOYS
TV REVIEW: THE END OF THE F***ING WORLD
TV REVIEW: THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT
TV REVIEW: THE LAST KINGDOM
TV REVIEW: THE MIDNIGHT GOSPEL
TV REVIEW: THE MOST DANGEROUS ANIMAL OF ALL (2020)
TV REVIEW: THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA
TV REVIEW: THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT
TV REVIEW: THE VOW
TV REVIEW: TREADSTONE (2019)
TV REVIEW: UNDONE
TV REVIEW: WANDAVISION
TV REVIEW: WARRIOR
TV REVIEW: WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS
TV REVIEW: ZEROZEROZERO
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS (2005)
UNDERRATED: THE KINGDOM (2007)

The Boys turns the superhero genre on its head

TV REVIEW: THE BOYS

PHOTO BY , COURTESY OF AMAZON STUDIOS

TV REVIEW: THE BOYS


Where is it playing?: Amazon Prime

What's it rated?: TV-MA

What's it worth?: $Full price (Glen Starkey)

What's it worth?: $Full price (Anna Starkey)

User Rating: 7.50 (1 Votes)

What if superheroes were actually corrupt and arrogant jerks who were owned by a corporation that monetizes them through films and merchandizing while carefully crafting their heroic public personas to appear virtuous and selfless? And what if a group of vigilantes knew the truth about these so-called heroes and worked to take them down? Welcome to The Boys, an action crime comedy that pits the titular vigilantes—led by profane and irreverent Billy Butcher (Karl Urban)—against The Seven, Vought International’s premier tier of superheroes—led by egotistical and increasingly unstable Homelander (Anthony Starr). (16 60-min. episodes)

Glen: We’re obviously a little late to this series, which first came out in 2019. Season 2 is now wrapping up with a third scheduled for 2021. Now’s the time to jump into this funny, violent, thoroughly entertaining, genre-flipping romp. The series opens with mild-mannered Hughie Campbell, who toils in an electronics store. He’s a nerd, but he has one thing going for him—Robin (Jess Salgueiro), a terrific out-of-his-league girlfriend who loves him. Then the unspeakable happens. The fastest man in the world, A-Train (Jessie T. Usher), one of The Seven, accidentally runs right through Robin, obliterating her body and leaving Hughie holding her severed arms. Now turned against superheroes, Hughie is slowly recruited by Billy Butcher into his team of vigilantes, along with Mother’s Milk (Laz Alonso) and Frenchie (Tomer Capon), all of whom have their own reasons to hate superheroes. What follows is Hughie’s descent into crime in the service of something greater.

Anna: Gotta love a hero-turned-villain tale and vice versa, and The Boys is an entertaining journey into both. Hughie is meek and mild mannered, living with his dad, Hugh (Simon Pegg), in a seemingly dull but happy enough existence. His bright, shiny reason for happiness is literally torn from him in the first few minutes of the first episode, and his descent into a deep, dark depression slowly takes a turn upward after meeting the newest member of The Seven, Annie—aka Starlight (Erin Moriarty). Raised believing she was chosen by God to be a superhero, Annie is the newest and most naive member of the elite team. Soon she realizes that the heroes she has looked up to her whole life are imperfect and, in some cases, really terrible human beings. The Deep (Chace Crawford) almost immediately forces himself on her, and while she stays quiet for a bit, she soon decides to take a stand against the corruption in her group. Little does she know how deep it all really goes, and soon she’s reluctantly joining Billy’s band of vigilantes as their inside spy. Even in binge mode this series doesn’t get boring. I’m excited for season 3!

Glen: It’s compelling to discover Butcher’s reason for hating superheroes and even more compelling to see that side plot unfold. I don’t want to spoil anything, but Butcher’s soon pitted against Homelander in a real grudge match. Of course, Homelander is unbeatable and too busy being a shallow, selfish prick to bother taking out Butcher himself, so he sends the redundantly monikered Black Noir (Nathan Mitchell), who’s completely silent. He’s sort of a weird character. The series is filled with deftly choreographed violence, and though they lack superpowers, the titular Boys led by Butcher are a slippery lot, always managing to escape death. Other important characters are Queen Maeve (Dominique McElligott), Homelander’s former paramour, who’s at risk of replacement in the second season when Stormfront (Aya Cash) shows up. There’s also The Seven’s handler, Madelyn Stillwell (Elisabeth Shue), who has a delicate relationship with the volatile leader of The Seven. Now’s a great time to get up to speed before the third season starts next year.

Anna: Watching Homelander’s mental unraveling is both infuriating and fun. He knows how much power he wields, and he’s not afraid to use it against people. There are moments where he’s fantasizing about taking the world out, and it’s not that far from what could be reality. The dude is seriously unhinged. He’s jealous and haughty and just an all-around manipulative jerk. All these supes have some real need for therapy, and being touted for their greatness their whole lives hasn’t led to healthy egos. Butcher’s team isn’t much better off—they are all wrestling their own demons. It’s as close to a big superhero movie as we’re going to get in quarantine, and with longer episodes and several storylines happening at once, there’s a lot to enjoy in the first couple of seasons. 

New Times Senior Staff Writer Glen Starkey and freelancer Anna Starkey write Sun Screen. Glen compiles streaming listings. Comment at gstarkey@newtimesslo.com.










Weekly Poll
What are the most important conversations to be having right now when it comes to policing?

We need to address how racial bias influences policing.
We should focus on funding the police so they can do their job.
Mental health is where our dollars need to go, both in and out of the police department.
As one Sept. 20 community input meeting attendee said, 'Let’s get back to the Old West and treat people like they should be treated.' (Interpret how you will.)

| Poll Results






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