Monday, August 19, 2019     Volume: 20, Issue: 24
Signup

Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
AVENGERS: ENDGAME
BINGEABLE: A.P. BIO
BINGEABLE: Barry
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG
BINGEABLE: GRACE AND FRANKIE
BINGEABLE: Green Porno
BINGEABLE: RUSSIAN DOLL
BINGEABLE: STRANGER THINGS 3
BINGEABLE: STREET FOOD
BLAST FROM THE PAST: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX
CRAWL
DARK PHOENIX
DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD
FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW
GOOD BOYS
HATEWATCH: CHOPPED
HATEWATCH: FRANKENSTEIN’S MONSTER’S MONSTER, FRANKENSTEIN
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM
MA
MIDSOMMAR
ONCE UPON A TIME … IN HOLLYWOOD
SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK
SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME
THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2
THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
THE HANGOVER
THE LION KING
TOY STORY 4
UNDERRATED: SHUTTER ISLAND
UNDERRATED: THE BATTERED BASTARDS OF BASEBALL
UNDERRATED: THE FALLING
WHERE’D YOU GO, BERNADETTE
WILD ROSE
YESTERDAY

SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK


Where is it playing?: Movies Lompoc

What's it rated?: PG-13

What's it worth?: $Matinee (Kasey Bubnash)

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

André Øvredal (The Autopsy of Jane Doe) and Guillermo del Toro (Pan’s Labyrinth, The Shape of Water) join forces to bring everyone’s favorite trilogy of haunting children’s books to the big screen for a new generation.

Everyone knows the basic rules of avoiding an unfortunate fate with the supernatural: Don’t go into the abandoned house where a long-dead family supposedly held their daughter hostage in a dark dungeon. Nope. Don’t steal that book that’s allegedly written in children’s blood by said daughter who was kept in said dungeon. For the love of God, split up to search for the medical records of said dungeon daughter in the clearly haunted insane asylum she was forced into so many years ago.

Everyone knows the rules, and yet time after time, curious teens in horror movies mock the rules and then break them, and then face the inevitable consequences.

That’s pretty much the extent of what you need to know about the overarching plot of Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark—there’s a haunted house, an old urban legend, and a group of dangerously curious teens (one kid is funny, of course) who don’t really believe in the power of old Sarah Bellows and her passion to kill children from beyond the grave. What more could you possibly need?

On the surface, this is a fairly boring and formulaic teen horror movie. A group of high schoolers decide to explore the centuries-old Bellows mansion on Halloween, where the family kept their daughter, Sarah, locked in a dark room because she was “off.” There, the teens stumble upon Sarah’s infamous book of scary stories, which according to legend, were written in the blood of the many children she killed using black magic. The teens take the book (big mistake) and soon find that the scary stories written about them will force them to face their biggest and most secret fears. Like, in real life.

Not real thought-provoking. And yet, I had a blast watching.

It was creepy and crawly. The monsters—all based closely on the genuinely disturbing illustrations from the Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark books—were well crafted and chilling. There were some big adrenaline-pumping scares, which I always love, and I have to admit I’m a sucker for a good discovering-the-truth-behind-the-old-scary-legend-to-stop-the-ghost sequence.

There’s something to be said for the mediocre, purely entertaining horror movies that act as a gateway for young and budding horror lovers to the really good movies. They’re fun to watch, and they bring more people over to the dark side. And that’s really what the original books aimed to do, too. (107 min.)

—Kasey Bubnash




Weekly Poll
How much trust do you have in Central Coast newspapers?

None, it's all fake news.
Some, but the reporting is biased.
It depends on the topic being covered.
A lot.

| Poll Results