Sunday, April 5, 2020     Volume: 21, Issue: 5
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
1917
AD ASTRA
BINGABLE: ABANDONED (2016)
BINGABLE: DON’T F**K WITH CATS: HUNTING AN INTERNET KILLER (2019)
BINGEABLE: Barry
BINGEABLE: CASA DE LAS FLORES
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG
BINGEABLE: GRACE AND FRANKIE
BINGEABLE: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARIES
BINGEABLE: OUTLANDER (2014-present)
BINGEABLE: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1995)
BINGEABLE: RUSSIAN DOLL
BINGEABLE: STRANGER THINGS 3
BINGEABLE: THE PEOPLE V. O.J. SIMPSON: AMERICAN CRIME STORY
BINGEABLE: THE SINNER (SEASON 2)
BIRDS OF PREY (AND THE FANTABULOUS EMANCIPATION OF ONE HARLEY QUINN)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: COOL RUNNINGS (1993)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: FISH TANK (2009)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: HOUSE
BLAST FROM THE PAST: OLDBOY
BLAST FROM THE PAST: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK
BLAST FROM THE PAST: ROBOCOP
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART
BLAST FROM THE PAST: YOU’VE GOT MAIL
BLOODSHOT
DOCTOR SLEEP
EMMA
FORD V FERRARI
GUILTY PLEASURE: THE HANGOVER
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
GUILTY PLEASURES: GIRL MEETS WORLD (2014-2017)
HATEWATCH: 92ND ACADEMY AWARDS (2020)
HATEWATCH: NAILED IT!
HATEWATCH: THE WITCHER (2019)
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM
I STILL BELIEVE
JOJO RABBIT
JOKER
KNIVES OUT
LITTLE WOMEN
MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN
ONCE UPON A TIME … IN HOLLYWOOD
ONWARD
THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
THE CALL OF THE WILD
THE GENTLEMEN
THE HUNT
THE INVISIBLE MAN
THE LIGHTHOUSE
THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON
THE WAY BACK
TV REVIEW:
TV REVIEW: LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE
TV REVIEW: SELF MADE: INSPIRED BY THE LIFE OF MADAM C.J. WALKER
TV REVIEW: TABOO
TV REVIEW: WESTWORLD (Season 3 debut)
UNCUT GEMS
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS
UNDERRATED: DOUBLE DRAGON (1994)
UNDERRATED: INSOMNIA
UNDERRATED: SHUTTER ISLAND
UNDERRATED: THE BATTERED BASTARDS OF BASEBALL
UNDERRATED: THE FALLING
YESTERDAY
ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAP

ONWARD

PHOTO BY , COURTESY OF PIXAR ANIMATION STUDIO

ONWARD


Where is it playing?: Hi-Way Drive-In, Movies Lompoc, Parks Plaza

What's it rated?: PG

What's it worth?: $Full price (Karen Garcia)

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

Dan Scanlon (Monsters University) directs Tom Holland and Chris Pratt as Ian and Barley Lightfoot, respectively, two teenage brothers on a magical quest to completely bring their deceased father back to life for a day.

In true Disney Pixar fashion, the story isn’t just about casting spells and bringing back a loved one; it’s also about appreciating what you have. Sprinkle in a coming-of-age storyline, and Onward cohesively ties all of these morals together.

The concept of losing a loved one, in this case a parent, might be new to the younger audience, so I recommend having a conversation with your child before going to the theater. The story heavily focuses on the sensitive subject and could result in some tears. Who am I kidding? You might need to pack some tissues in your pocket just in case.

Onward takes place in a world inhabited by mythical creatures—pixies, centaurs, elves—but the world itself has lost its enchantment. Instead of working hard and practicing a spell that will illuminate a home, the creatures eventually invent electricity. The technology might have made life easier, however, the magic that made these creatures so unique has faded.

Fast-forward to the modern-day version of this world, and in a suburb of New Mushroomton lives Ian; his brother, Barley (Dungeons and Dragons-esque role-player); and their mom, Laurel (Julia Louis-Dreyfus).

Ian is a gawky and shy teenager who’s afraid of merging onto the freeway and asking his classmates to his birthday party. On top of your average teenage anxiety, Ian is also navigating life without a father figure—his dad, Wilden (Kyle Bornheimer), died of an illness before he was born. On Ian’s 16th birthday, Laurel gives her sons a gift that was left by their father. The boys uncover a magical staff, a rare gem, and a letter that has a visitation spell. With the gift and spell in hand, the boys could potentially resurrect their father; Ian wants nothing more than to know his dad.

After repeated failed attempts to cast the spell by Barley, Ian picks up the staff and haphazardly casts the spell, but a combination of lack of confidence and the intensity of the magic only allows half of their father to come back, specifically his torso to his feet.

The Lightfoot brothers must embark on a historical quest to bring back the second half of their father before the spell wares off.

The story is lighthearted and funny, with plenty of room for tears, but the aspect of loss and appreciation for those who are still living is something that won’t fly over the heads of most young audiences.

I read several reviews where critics felt the film didn’t break any Pixar boundaries or surpass anything that’s been done already. I think we could all learn something from Onward—from one of the many morals of the story. Just because we have technology that makes things easier or visually advanced doesn’t mean it’s great overall. Why can’t we appreciate the visual aspect of the story and the meaning behind it? Why are we always searching for more when we have something great right in front of us? (102 min.)

—Karen Garcia








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