Wednesday, September 22, 2021     Volume: 22, Issue: 29
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
A QUIET PLACE PART II
ANOTHER ROUND
BINGEABLE: 100 FOOT WAVE (2021-)
BINGEABLE: BARRY (2018-)
BINGEABLE: CLICKBAIT
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG (2016-2019)
BINGEABLE: SWEET TOOTH
BINGEABLE: THE WHITE LOTUS
BINGEABLE: TITANS (2018-)
BLACK WIDOW
BLAST FROM THE PAST: CARRIE (1976)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX (1999)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART (1990)
BOSS LEVEL
CANDYMAN
CRY MACHO
GUILTY PLEASURE: BACHELOR IN PARADISE (2014-)
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
GUILTY PLEASURES: GUNPOWDER MILKSHAKE
GUILTY PLEASURES: JOLT
HAVE A GOOD TRIP: ADVENTURES IN PSYCHEDELICS
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM (1996)
I CARE A LOT
I’M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS
IRRESISTIBLE
LIMBO
MISHA AND THE WOLVES (2021)
NEW FLICKS: BLOOD RED SKY
NEW FLICKS: CODA
NEW FLICKS: COPSHOP
NEW FLICKS: CRUELLA
NEW FLICKS: REMINISCENCE
NEW FLICKS: SWEET GIRL
NEW FLICKS: THE SUICIDE SQUAD
NEW FLICKS: VAL (2021)
NINE DAYS
NO SUDDEN MOVE
PIG
ROADRUNNER: A FILM ABOUT ANTHONY BOURDAIN (2021)
SOUL
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM (2019)
THE LAST BLOCKBUSTER (2020)
THE MAP OF TINY PERFECT THINGS
THE NEW MUTANTS
THE PAPER TIGERS
THE PROFESSOR AND THE MADMAN
THE SUNLIT NIGHT
TV REVIEW: A WILDERNESS OF ERROR (2020)
TV REVIEW: BATES MOTEL
TV REVIEW: DEFENDING JACOB
TV REVIEW: EXTERMINATE ALL THE BRUTES (2021)
TV REVIEW: HELL ON WHEELS (2011-2016)
TV REVIEW: HOMECOMING
TV REVIEW: HOW TO WITH JOHN WILSON
TV REVIEW: I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE
TV REVIEW: I MAY DESTROY YOU
TV REVIEW: LENOX HILL
TV REVIEW: LITTLE AMERICA
TV REVIEW: MARE OF EASTTOWN
TV REVIEW: MRS. AMERICA
TV REVIEW: ONE MISSISSIPPI
TV REVIEW: PAINTING WITH JOHN (2021)
TV REVIEW: RAMY
TV REVIEW: RUN
TV REVIEW: SPACE FORCE
TV REVIEW: TABOO
TV REVIEW: TED LASSO (2020-)
TV REVIEW: THE BOYS
TV REVIEW: THE END OF THE F***ING WORLD
TV REVIEW: THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT
TV REVIEW: THE LAST KINGDOM
TV REVIEW: THE MIDNIGHT GOSPEL
TV REVIEW: THE MOST DANGEROUS ANIMAL OF ALL (2020)
TV REVIEW: THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA
TV REVIEW: THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT
TV REVIEW: THE VOW
TV REVIEW: TREADSTONE (2019)
TV REVIEW: UNDONE
TV REVIEW: WANDAVISION
TV REVIEW: WARRIOR
TV REVIEW: WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS
TV REVIEW: ZEROZEROZERO
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS (2005)
UNDERRATED: THE KINGDOM (2007)

NEW FLICKS: REMINISCENCE

PHOTO BY , COURTESY OF WARNER BROS. PICTURES

NEW FLICKS: REMINISCENCE


Where is it playing?: HBO Max, and in theaters

What's it rated?: PG-13

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

Lisa Joy (co-creator and executive producer of HBO’s Westworld) helms this sci-fi thriller, which marks the writer-director’s feature film debut. The film takes place in Miami, during a not so far-fetched future where climate change has caused the oceans to rise and flood the city.

The imagery is pretty neat, as the tops of Miami’s skyscrapers are still visible over the ocean. It reminded me of the flooded New York scenery in Spielberg’s underrated masterpiece, A.I. Artificial Intelligence (in fact, please go do yourself a favor and watch that instead). This semi-apocalyptic setting is the most interesting aspect of Reminiscence, but the script is unfortunately not on par.

The premise is intriguing though: Hugh Jackman plays Nick Bannister, who works for a company that allows customers to relive nostalgic memories from the past, as a way of escaping the dreary present. After the woman he loves, only referred to as Mae (Rebecca Ferguson, who also worked with Jackman in The Greatest Showman), goes missing, Bannister begins revisiting his own memories over and over in an attempt to find clues and track her current whereabouts.

I think I would have enjoyed Reminiscence more if it wasn’t so exposition-heavy, especially within the dialogue and Jackman’s constant narration (which feels unnecessary, and condescending at times). Maybe they’ll release a cut without narration someday, a la the director’s cut of Blade Runner, which removed Harrison Ford’s lambasted voiceovers.

While its visuals are certainly memorable, the overall experience of watching Reminiscence is ironically forgettable. (148 min.)

—Caleb Wiseblood










Weekly Poll
What are the most important conversations to be having right now when it comes to policing?

We need to address how racial bias influences policing.
We should focus on funding the police so they can do their job.
Mental health is where our dollars need to go, both in and out of the police department.
As one Sept. 20 community input meeting attendee said,

| Poll Results






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