Tuesday, March 31, 2020     Volume: 21, Issue: 4
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
1917
AD ASTRA
BINGABLE: ABANDONED (2016)
BINGABLE: DON’T F**K WITH CATS: HUNTING AN INTERNET KILLER (2019)
BINGEABLE: Barry
BINGEABLE: CASA DE LAS FLORES
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG
BINGEABLE: GRACE AND FRANKIE
BINGEABLE: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARIES
BINGEABLE: OUTLANDER (2014-present)
BINGEABLE: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1995)
BINGEABLE: RUSSIAN DOLL
BINGEABLE: STRANGER THINGS 3
BINGEABLE: THE PEOPLE V. O.J. SIMPSON: AMERICAN CRIME STORY
BINGEABLE: THE SINNER (SEASON 2)
BIRDS OF PREY (AND THE FANTABULOUS EMANCIPATION OF ONE HARLEY QUINN)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: COOL RUNNINGS (1993)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: FISH TANK (2009)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: HOUSE
BLAST FROM THE PAST: OLDBOY
BLAST FROM THE PAST: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK
BLAST FROM THE PAST: ROBOCOP
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART
BLAST FROM THE PAST: YOU’VE GOT MAIL
BLOODSHOT
DOCTOR SLEEP
DOWNHILL
EMMA
FANTASY ISLAND
FORD V FERRARI
GUILTY PLEASURE: THE HANGOVER
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
GUILTY PLEASURES: GIRL MEETS WORLD (2014-2017)
HATEWATCH: 92ND ACADEMY AWARDS (2020)
HATEWATCH: NAILED IT!
HATEWATCH: THE WITCHER (2019)
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM
I STILL BELIEVE
JOJO RABBIT
JOKER
JUST MERCY
KNIVES OUT
LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE
LITTLE WOMEN
MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN
MY HERO ACADEMIA: HEROES RISING
ONCE UPON A TIME … IN HOLLYWOOD
ONWARD
SONIC THE HEDGEHOG
THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
THE CALL OF THE WILD
THE GENTLEMEN
THE HUNT
THE INVISIBLE MAN
THE LAST FULL MEASURE
THE LIGHTHOUSE
THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON
THE WAY BACK
UNCUT GEMS
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS
UNDERRATED: DOUBLE DRAGON (1994)
UNDERRATED: INSOMNIA
UNDERRATED: SHUTTER ISLAND
UNDERRATED: THE BATTERED BASTARDS OF BASEBALL
UNDERRATED: THE FALLING
WESTWORLD (Season 3 debut)
YESTERDAY
ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAP

LITTLE WOMEN

PHOTO BY COURTESY OF COLUMBIA PICTURES

LITTLE WOMEN


Where is it playing?: Santa Maria 14, Parks Plaza

What's it rated?: PG

What's it worth?: $Matinee (Glen Starkey)

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

Greta Gerwig (Ladybird) helms this new version of the classic 1868-69 Louisa May Alcott novel, which follows the lives of the four March sistersMeg (Emma Watson), Jo (Saoirse Ronan), Amy (Florence Pugh), and Beth (Eliza Scanlen)as they come of age in 1860s New England, amid the aftermath of the Civil War. Though this is an oft-told tale, with now eight film adaptations, Gerwig’s new version is a real standout, turning the story into a poioumenon, a work of art about its own creation.

Though all four March sisters are given some screen time, the main character is Jo, the tomboyish writer who’s ostensibly a stand-in for Alcott herself in this semi-autobiographical tale that was based on the author and her sisters’ lives. Gerwig’s film version deviates from Alcott’s two-volume novel in various ways, perhaps most significantly by traveling back and forth between the two volumes, the first being the girls’ younger years and the second being their early adulthood. Gerwig breaks chronology by moving back and forth through time, showing how earlier events informed the sisters’ present circumstances.

If you’re familiar with the tale, the main events are all there: the family giving their Christmas breakfast to a poor neighboring family, Beth contracting scarlet fever, Amy falling through the ice, Meg attending a debutantes’ ball, and Jo selling her short stories. Likewise, most of the characters appear, like their handsome neighbor, Theodore “Laurie” Laurence (Timothée Chalamet), and his wealthy grandfather, Mr. Laurence (Chris Cooper); Laurie’s tutor and Meg’s future love interest, John Brooke (James Norton); and of course the sisters’ amazing mother, Marmee (Laura Dern) and their housekeeper Hannah (Jayne Houdyshell); and of course the sisters’ Aunt March (a typically wonderful Meryl Streep). There’s also Jo’s love interest, the German professor Friedrich Bhaer (Louis Garrel, an actor much more handsome than how his character is described in Alcott’s novel).

The best thing about Gerwig’s version is how she pays tribute to Alcott, who never married or had any children of her own, and who after the publication of her famed and incredibly popular novel, often complained how her publisher forced her to create the expected happy ending. Gerwig pulls off the neat trick of having it both ways—creating an ending that honors the book and its author. I really loved this film, but grab the tissues—it just may have you ugly-crying. (135 min.)

—Glen Starkey








Weekly Poll
How are you occupying your time during this pandemic?

Catching up on movies and books I've been wanting to read or watch.
Enjoying the extra time at home with my family.
Going hiking or running as much as possible.
Cooking, baking, and trying new recipes.

| Poll Results






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