Sunday, April 5, 2020     Volume: 21, Issue: 5
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
1917
AD ASTRA
BINGABLE: ABANDONED (2016)
BINGABLE: DON’T F**K WITH CATS: HUNTING AN INTERNET KILLER (2019)
BINGEABLE: Barry
BINGEABLE: CASA DE LAS FLORES
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG
BINGEABLE: GRACE AND FRANKIE
BINGEABLE: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARIES
BINGEABLE: OUTLANDER (2014-present)
BINGEABLE: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1995)
BINGEABLE: RUSSIAN DOLL
BINGEABLE: STRANGER THINGS 3
BINGEABLE: THE PEOPLE V. O.J. SIMPSON: AMERICAN CRIME STORY
BINGEABLE: THE SINNER (SEASON 2)
BIRDS OF PREY (AND THE FANTABULOUS EMANCIPATION OF ONE HARLEY QUINN)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: COOL RUNNINGS (1993)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: FISH TANK (2009)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: HOUSE
BLAST FROM THE PAST: OLDBOY
BLAST FROM THE PAST: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK
BLAST FROM THE PAST: ROBOCOP
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART
BLAST FROM THE PAST: YOU’VE GOT MAIL
BLOODSHOT
DOCTOR SLEEP
EMMA
FORD V FERRARI
GUILTY PLEASURE: THE HANGOVER
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
GUILTY PLEASURES: GIRL MEETS WORLD (2014-2017)
HATEWATCH: 92ND ACADEMY AWARDS (2020)
HATEWATCH: NAILED IT!
HATEWATCH: THE WITCHER (2019)
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM
I STILL BELIEVE
JOJO RABBIT
JOKER
KNIVES OUT
LITTLE WOMEN
MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN
ONCE UPON A TIME … IN HOLLYWOOD
ONWARD
THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
THE CALL OF THE WILD
THE GENTLEMEN
THE HUNT
THE INVISIBLE MAN
THE LIGHTHOUSE
THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON
THE WAY BACK
TV REVIEW:
TV REVIEW: LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE
TV REVIEW: SELF MADE: INSPIRED BY THE LIFE OF MADAM C.J. WALKER
TV REVIEW: TABOO
TV REVIEW: WESTWORLD (Season 3 debut)
UNCUT GEMS
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS
UNDERRATED: DOUBLE DRAGON (1994)
UNDERRATED: INSOMNIA
UNDERRATED: SHUTTER ISLAND
UNDERRATED: THE BATTERED BASTARDS OF BASEBALL
UNDERRATED: THE FALLING
YESTERDAY
ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAP

EMMA

PHOTO BY , COURTESY OF PERFECT WORLD PICTURES

EMMA


Where is it playing?: Parks Plaza

What's it rated?: PG

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

Jane Austen’s comedic romantic novel, Emma, gets adapted to the big screen for the seventh time with Autumn de Wilde directing Eleanor Catton’s adaptation. It’s 19th century England, and well-meaning but selfish 20-year-old Emma Woodhouse (Anya Taylor-Joy), a self-styled matchmaker, goes about her days meddling in the affairs of those around her. 

It turns out catching a catch and making the perfect match isn’t as easy as it might seem. 

Adorned with satin ribbons, corsets, and jewels, Taylor-Joy brings us this generation’s Emma Woodhouse, Jane Austen’s humorously clueless 20-year-old who considers herself to be quite the matchmaker. And yes, in this 2020 adaptation of the classic novel, Emma Woodhouse is still just as handsome, clever, and rich as ever. 

If you’re old enough to read a book or watch a movie, you probably know how this old story goes. Emma lives with her father in an enormous English manor just a few miles outside London in the early 19th century. She, who tends to think a little too fondly of her own abilities, often finds herself bored by the usual goings on of the tiny town where she lives. 

But she, a natural social butterfly, has a knack for manipulation through pure charm, and she entertains herself by pairing off her friends, family members, and acquaintances. When she befriends Harriet (Mia Goth), a young girl living in a nearby school who sits several pegs below Emma on the unforgiving social ladder of the olden days, Emma sees a way to improve Harriet’s societal standing: marrying up. 

In brightly colored manors and in equally ornamental dresses, we watch as Emma, between sips of tea, amusingly and repeatedly fails to force Harriet into a romantic relationship, while clumsily stumbling into love herself.

Director de Wilde adds to the comedic and quirky tone of the film with color palettes and symmetry reminiscent of Wes Anderson, and pokes fun at the upper classes of the era with many of the characters’ strange eccentricities and silently annoyed servants peppered throughout.

Though Emma 2020 is generally engaging throughout, it’s not like laugh-out-loud funny for the most part. It’s certainly not as good as Clueless, the 1995 valley girl version of Emma that, as we all know, is a masterpiece that deserves to go down in history as one of the best and most pure comedies of all time. (Don’t @ me!) But I thoroughly enjoyed this generation’s Emma.

It’s cute. It’s fun. It’s entertaining. I felt good and happy once all was said and done and the credits were rolling. When I left the theater, I smiled as I thought of the ending, and I heard other audience members laughing as they talked it over. In this time of democratic decline and political polarization in America, what more could we as a nation really need? (124 min.)

—Kasey Bubnash








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