Wednesday, May 18, 2022     Volume: 23, Issue: 11
Signup

Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
A QUIET PLACE PART II
ANOTHER ROUND
BINGEABLE: 100 FOOT WAVE (2021)
BINGEABLE: ABBOTT ELEMENTARY (2021-present)
BINGEABLE: ANATOMY OF A SCANDAL (2022)
BINGEABLE: BARRY (2018-present)
BINGEABLE: CASTLEVANIA (2017-2021)
BINGEABLE: CHEER (2020-present)
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG (2016-2019)
BINGEABLE: INVENTING ANNA (2022)
BINGEABLE: KUNG FU (2021)
BINGEABLE: LIFE & BETH (2022)
BINGEABLE: MAID (2021)
BINGEABLE: MIDNIGHT MASS (2021)
BINGEABLE: ONLY MURDERS IN THE BUILDING (2021)
BINGEABLE: SOMEBODY SOMEWHERE (2022-)
BINGEABLE: SQUID GAME (2021)
BINGEABLE: STATION ELEVEN (2021)
BINGEABLE: SWEET TOOTH
BINGEABLE: TELL ME YOUR SECRETS (2021)
BINGEABLE: THE GREAT (2020-present)
BINGEABLE: THE THING ABOUT PAM (2022)
BINGEABLE: THE WOMAN IN THE HOUSE ACROSS THE STREET FROM THE GIRL IN THE WINDOW (2022)
BINGEABLE: TOKYO VICE (2022)
BINGEABLE: UNDERCURRENT: THE DISAPPEARANCE OF KIM WALL (2022)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: COWBOY BEBOP (1998)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX (1999)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE SHOOTING (1966)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART (1990)
BOSS LEVEL
C’MON C’MON
EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE
GHOSTBUSTERS: AFTERLIFE
GUILTY PLEASURES: GUNPOWDER MILKSHAKE
GUILTY PLEASURES: JOLT
HAVE A GOOD TRIP: ADVENTURES IN PSYCHEDELICS
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM (1996)
I CARE A LOT
I’M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS
LICORICE PIZZA
NEW FLICKS: ANTLERS
NEW FLICKS: ARMY OF THIEVES
NEW FLICKS: CRUELLA
NEW FLICKS: DON’T LOOK UP
NEW FLICKS: ENCOUNTER
NEW FLICKS: FINCH
NEW FLICKS: FRESH
NEW FLICKS: I WANT YOU BACK
NEW FLICKS: KATE
NEW FLICKS: KIMI
NEW FLICKS: RED NOTICE
NEW FLICKS: RIDERS OF JUSTICE
NEW FLICKS: SHANG-CHI AND THE LEGEND OF THE TEN RINGS
NEW FLICKS: THE FOREVER PRISONER (2021)
NEW FLICKS: THE NORTHMAN
NEW FLICKS: VIVARIUM
NINE DAYS
NINE PERFECT STRANGERS (2021)
PIG
SOUL
SPIDER-MAN: NO WAY HOME
THE ADAM PROJECT
THE BATMAN
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM (2019)
THE HARDER THEY FALL
THE LOST CITY
THE LOST DAUGHTER
THE MAP OF TINY PERFECT THINGS
THE NEW MUTANTS
THE PAPER TIGERS
THE POWER OF THE DOG
THE PROFESSOR AND THE MADMAN
THE SUNLIT NIGHT
THE TENDER BAR
THE TRAGEDY OF MACBETH
THE UNBEARABLE WEIGHT OF MASSIVE TALENT
TV REVIEW: BATES MOTEL
TV REVIEW: DEFENDING JACOB
TV REVIEW: EXTERMINATE ALL THE BRUTES (2021)
TV REVIEW: HOMECOMING
TV REVIEW: HOW TO WITH JOHN WILSON
TV REVIEW: I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE
TV REVIEW: I MAY DESTROY YOU
TV REVIEW: LENOX HILL
TV REVIEW: LITTLE AMERICA
TV REVIEW: MARE OF EASTTOWN
TV REVIEW: MRS. AMERICA
TV REVIEW: ONE MISSISSIPPI
TV REVIEW: PAINTING WITH JOHN (2021)
TV REVIEW: RAMY
TV REVIEW: RUN
TV REVIEW: SPACE FORCE
TV REVIEW: TABOO (2017)
TV REVIEW: TED LASSO (2020-present)
TV REVIEW: THE BOYS
TV REVIEW: THE END OF THE F***ING WORLD
TV REVIEW: THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT
TV REVIEW: THE LAST KINGDOM
TV REVIEW: THE MIDNIGHT GOSPEL
TV REVIEW: THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA
TV REVIEW: THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT
TV REVIEW: UNDONE
TV REVIEW: WARRIOR
TV REVIEW: WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS
TV REVIEW: ZEROZEROZERO
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS (2005)
UNDERRATED: THE KINGDOM (2007)
YOU WON’T BE ALONE

'C’mon C’mon' is a beautifully crafted story about family, listening, and love

C’MON C’MON

PHOTO BY , COURTESY OF A24

C’MON C’MON


Where is it playing?: Showtime, On demand

What's it rated?: R

What's it worth?: $Full price (Glen Starkey)

What's it worth?: $Full price (Anna Starkey)

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

Writer-director Mike Mills (Thumbsucker, Beginners) helms this drama about radio journalist, Johnny (Joaquin Phoenix), who takes a cross-country trip with his young nephew, Jesse (Woody Norman). (B&W, 109 min.)

Glen: This soulful little slice-of-life drama is so naturalistic, authentic, and real that it feels more like peering into people’s private lives than watching a film. The story itself is exceedingly simple. Johnny agrees to watch his nephew, Jesse, when his sister, Viv (Gaby Hoffman), has to help her mentally ill husband, Paul (Scoot McNairy), as he works through a breakdown. The siblings haven’t talked much since their mother (Deborah Strang) died the previous year. Since then, Johnny’s relationship with his girlfriend ended while Viv has struggled with her sick husband and her precocious and somewhat odd son, Jesse. It’s all pretty common family drama, but at the heart of the story is the transformational relationship that grows between Johnny and Jesse—both wounded souls in their own ways, both in desperate need of connection, and both trying to navigate their emotional baggage. It’s all set alongside Johnny’s current work project, which is interviewing young people about how they feel about the future. Though it started off a little slow and flat for me, the story and characters sucked me in, and by the conclusion, I was fully emotionally invested. This is an amazing piece of cinema.

Anna: It’s definitely not an action film, but the earnest relationships here keep it compelling. Every character is complicated with a vein of sadness running deep, and everyone also loves each other deeply—even within the imperfections they all hold. Phoenix is one of my favorites; he chooses his roles with clear intention, and I’m always impressed by the depths he will take himself to in a role. His main counterparts in this, Jesse and Viv, match his talent, and young Norman is a total gem. The casting director must have been so excited when this wide-eyed and tenderhearted kid walked in the door. Johnny can’t stay in LA and can’t stand the thought of leaving Jesse behind, so he packs himself and the kid up and heads to New York, a new experience for Jesse whose delicate emotional balance puts Johnny in a tough spot. Jesse already feels abandoned and has a mentally ill father whose manias have no doubt taken their toll. He’s thoughtful and sweet and sometimes difficult in the way that only children can be. The interviews with kids are especially poignant in this film; they all display deep thought and emotion with heartfelt and honest answers to life’s big questions. This film hits all the marks for me, and it’s one I will surely watch again.

Glen: Phoenix, Hoffman, and McNairy are all terrific, dependable actors, and the performances are uniformly incredible. How director Mills coaxed young Norman—who’s only 11 but already has 15 acting credits to his name—to deliver such a nuanced and multilayered performance is nothing short of miraculous. I wish I’d seen this film before I became a step-parent. It’s a lesson in learning how to listen—I mean really listen—and understand what a child is saying (and not saying). This is such a thoughtful, deeply considered film. The characters feel sadness, joy, frustration, longing … they’re so real. It’s a quiet, small film on the surface, but it’s full of weighty ideas, and it’s filled with awards-worthy performances, direction and writing, and gorgeous black and white cinematography by Robbie Ryan. This is the antithesis of the Hollywood big-budget blockbuster, and—oh my—what a delicious change of pace.

Anna: This is the type of film I beg and plead for when there’s nothing but big box-office hits in theaters. Give me the quiet nuance and subtle beauty of actual character building over explosions and one-liners any day! I love to see actual craft happening on the big screen. The black and white filming was such a beautiful choice too; it’s one of those things that just cuts down on the noise around the studied performances, and despite saturation, you still see, feel, and hear the sounds of these places. Whether it’s the skate park in LA, or the beach, or the streets of New York, or a parade in New Orleans, director Mills conveys the vibrancy of the locations so well. You’re right that a lot of what this film is about is the learning curve that comes with children, especially if you’re not an everyday fixture in their lives and used to the day-in and day-out of the exhausting work of forming a human life with compassion and integrity. It never feels like you’re doing it totally right, but giving a child truth and humanity and perhaps a warm body to cuddle up with at night is ultimately what forms them. I can’t say it too much—this film was a total win for me. I can’t recommend it enough.

New Times Senior Staff Writer Glen Starkey and freelancer Anna Starkey write Sun Screen. Glen compiles streaming listings. Comment at gstarkey@newtimesslo.com.










Weekly Poll
What type of vegetable would you grow in a free community garden?

Brussel Sprouts, they are the best.
Broccoli because it can go with any meal.
Tomatoes, although I think those are technically a fruit.
French fries!

| Poll Results






My 805 Tix - Tickets to upcoming events