Tuesday, December 1, 2020     Volume: 21, Issue: 39
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
BEST WISHES, WARMEST REGARDS: A SCHITT’S CREEK FAREWELL
BINGABLE: ABANDONED (2016)
BINGEABLE: Barry
BINGEABLE: CASA DE LAS FLORES
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG
BINGEABLE: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARIES
BINGEABLE: OUTLANDER (2014-present)
BINGEABLE: STRANGER THINGS 3
BINGEABLE: THE SINNER (SEASON 2)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: COOL RUNNINGS (1993)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: FISH TANK (2009)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: HOUSE
BLAST FROM THE PAST: OLDBOY
BLAST FROM THE PAST: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART (1990)
BLOW THE MAN DOWN
BORAT SUBSEQUENT MOVIEFILM
DA 5 BLOODS
DAVID ATTENBOROUGH: A LIFE ON OUR PLANET
FIRST COW
GREYHOUND
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
HAVE A GOOD TRIP: ADVENTURES IN PSYCHEDELICS
HE LAST BLACK MAN IN SAN FRANCISCO
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM
I’M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS
LYING AND STEALING
SHUT UP LITTLE MAN! AN AUDIO MISADVENTURE (2011)
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
THE OPERATIVE
THE TRIAL OF THE CHICAGO SEVEN
THE VAST OF NIGHT
TREAD
TV REVIEW: BOSCH
TV REVIEW: CATCH-22
TV REVIEW: COBRA KAI
TV REVIEW: DEFENDING JACOB
TV REVIEW: FEAR CITY
TV REVIEW: GENERATION KILL (2008)
TV REVIEW: HANNIBAL (2013-2015)
TV REVIEW: HELL ON WHEELS (2011-2016)
TV REVIEW: HOMECOMING
TV REVIEW: I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE
TV REVIEW: I MAY DESTROY YOU
TV REVIEW: I’LL BE GONE IN THE DARK
TV REVIEW: JULIE AND THE PHANTOMS
TV REVIEW: LENOX HILL
TV REVIEW: LITTLE AMERICA
TV REVIEW: LOVE ON THE SPECTRUM
TV REVIEW: LOVECRAFT COUNTRY
TV REVIEW: MRS. AMERICA
TV REVIEW: PANDEMIC: HOW TO PREVENT AN OUTBREAK (2020)
TV REVIEW: RAISED BY WOLVES
TV REVIEW: RAMY
TV REVIEW: RUN
TV REVIEW: SPACE FORCE
TV REVIEW: TABOO
TV REVIEW: THE BOYS
TV REVIEW: THE END OF THE F***ING WORLD
TV REVIEW: THE HAUNTING OF BLY MANOR
TV REVIEW: THE LAST KINGDOM
TV REVIEW: THE MIDNIGHT GOSPEL
TV REVIEW: THE MORNING SHOW
TV REVIEW: THE MOST DANGEROUS ANIMAL OF ALL
TV REVIEW: THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA
TV REVIEW: THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT
TV REVIEW: THE THIRD DAY
TV REVIEW: THE VOW
TV REVIEW: TREADSTONE (2019)
TV REVIEW: TRIAL 4 (2020)
TV REVIEW: UNDONE
TV REVIEW: WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS
TV REVIEW: ZEROZEROZERO
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS
UNDERRATED: THE BATTERED BASTARDS OF BASEBALL
[UN]WELL

BLAST FROM THE PAST: OLDBOY

PHOTO BY PHOTO COURTESY OF CJ ENTERTAINMENT

BLAST FROM THE PAST: OLDBOY


Where is it playing?: Vudu, Tubi

What's it rated?: R

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

If someone ruined your life, and I mean ruined it, what’s the worst form of retaliation you can think of? Say this person broke your heart, publicly embarrassed you, stole your money and dignity, killed your child—whatever it may be—what’s the most horrible, awful, painful plan you can drum up to get even? The strategy for vengeance you’d fantasize about night after sleepless night?

Whatever your worst is, I guarantee it’s not half as shockingly cruel and unusual as the story of revenge that plays out in Oldboy. In this South Korean action-thriller, known originally as Oldeuboi, director and co-writer Chan-wook Park (Sympathy for Mr. Vengeance, The Handmaiden) shows us just how disturbing and somehow still unsatisfactory getting payback can be.

The plot hinges on the beaten path of Dae-su Oh (Min-sik Choi), a typical businessman who is suddenly abducted on the night of his daughter’s fourth birthday. Dae-su is taken to a strange, illicit prison, where his cell is reminiscent of a windowless hotel room. He’s left with nothing more than a bed, a bathroom, and a TV, and that’s where he stays for 15 years, all the while unsure of who has imprisoned him and why. 

Television is Dae-su’s only source of entertainment and connection to the outside world throughout his kidnapping, and on the news one day he sees that his wife was murdered, his daughter is missing, and he’s the suspected killer. Eventually he begins to dig his way out through the wall of his room, but just before he breaks through to the outdoors, he’s hypnotized by a mysterious woman and then wakes up on a rooftop dressed in a suit.

It’s 2003, the first time he’s seen sunlight since 1988, but Dae-su wastes little time. Instantly, he’s on a fervid hunt for his captor, for whom he has vicious plans. He also begins the search for his long-lost daughter, who he discovers was put up for adoption shortly after his wife was killed. 

But it soon becomes apparent that Dae-su’s captor, a man named Woo-jin Lee, is several steps ahead, and is somehow always watching. Dae-su’s only consolation is Mi-do, a young sushi chef he quickly falls in love with who helps him search for his daughter and fight his tormentor.

It’s impossible to really write about this movie without giving away all the big twists and turns and shockers, but I will say that Mi-do—though sweet, helpful, and loving—is not what she seems. And although Dae-su is seeking a little quid pro quo for the murder of his wife, the loss of his daughter, and his 15-year imprisonment, it’s really his captor, Woo-jin, who is seeking revenge, and he gets it not through gory torture, but through mental and emotional anguish. Years of imprisonment turns out to be the least of Dae-su’s worries.

Why? You’ll have to watch to find out.

—Kasey Bubnash 










Weekly Poll
How should Santa Barbara County enforce the state-imposed COVID-19 restrictions?

Make sure businesses are compliant, but let individuals make the choice for themselves,
Ticket people who break the mask order and increase business enforcement.
Take an educational approach.
Do nothing—this is a free country!

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