Sunday, April 5, 2020     Volume: 21, Issue: 5
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
1917
AD ASTRA
BINGABLE: ABANDONED (2016)
BINGABLE: DON’T F**K WITH CATS: HUNTING AN INTERNET KILLER (2019)
BINGEABLE: Barry
BINGEABLE: CASA DE LAS FLORES
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG
BINGEABLE: GRACE AND FRANKIE
BINGEABLE: NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC DOCUMENTARIES
BINGEABLE: OUTLANDER (2014-present)
BINGEABLE: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1995)
BINGEABLE: RUSSIAN DOLL
BINGEABLE: STRANGER THINGS 3
BINGEABLE: THE PEOPLE V. O.J. SIMPSON: AMERICAN CRIME STORY
BINGEABLE: THE SINNER (SEASON 2)
BIRDS OF PREY (AND THE FANTABULOUS EMANCIPATION OF ONE HARLEY QUINN)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: COOL RUNNINGS (1993)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: FISH TANK (2009)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: HOUSE
BLAST FROM THE PAST: OLDBOY
BLAST FROM THE PAST: RAIDERS OF THE LOST ARK
BLAST FROM THE PAST: ROBOCOP
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART
BLAST FROM THE PAST: YOU’VE GOT MAIL
BLOODSHOT
DOCTOR SLEEP
EMMA
FORD V FERRARI
GUILTY PLEASURE: THE HANGOVER
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
GUILTY PLEASURES: GIRL MEETS WORLD (2014-2017)
HATEWATCH: 92ND ACADEMY AWARDS (2020)
HATEWATCH: NAILED IT!
HATEWATCH: THE WITCHER (2019)
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM
I STILL BELIEVE
JOJO RABBIT
JOKER
KNIVES OUT
LITTLE WOMEN
MOTHERLESS BROOKLYN
ONCE UPON A TIME … IN HOLLYWOOD
ONWARD
THE ART OF RACING IN THE RAIN
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM
THE CALL OF THE WILD
THE GENTLEMEN
THE HUNT
THE INVISIBLE MAN
THE LIGHTHOUSE
THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON
THE WAY BACK
TV REVIEW:
TV REVIEW: LITTLE FIRES EVERYWHERE
TV REVIEW: SELF MADE: INSPIRED BY THE LIFE OF MADAM C.J. WALKER
TV REVIEW: TABOO
TV REVIEW: WESTWORLD (Season 3 debut)
UNCUT GEMS
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS
UNDERRATED: DOUBLE DRAGON (1994)
UNDERRATED: INSOMNIA
UNDERRATED: SHUTTER ISLAND
UNDERRATED: THE BATTERED BASTARDS OF BASEBALL
UNDERRATED: THE FALLING
YESTERDAY
ZOMBIELAND: DOUBLE TAP

BINGEABLE: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1995)

PHOTO BY , COURTESY OF HULU

BINGEABLE: PRIDE AND PREJUDICE (1995)


Where is it playing?: Hulu, DVD, Blu-ray

What's it rated?: TV-PG

User Rating: 0.00 (0 Votes)

It is a truth universally acknowledged that Pride and Prejudice is an unassailable classic.

While there is no enjoyment like reading, if I can’t be reading the novel, the best way to traipse through Regency England is with Colin Firth. I ardently admire and love the 1995, six-hour BBC mini-series. It’s all about the details—details in the casting (Firth is the only Mr. Darcy for me), the costumes, the sets, the actors’ posture and delivery. Everything is thought out and executed with care and precision.

This version, unlike most of the shorter adaptations, allows us to dwell in the narrative and ingest the nuances of Jane Austen’s witty, astute jabs at society and humanity in general. Yes, the characters’ manners are rather stiff to our modern eyes, but there is space to enjoy the palpable strength and authenticity of the female leads. There’s ample time to feel the conflicts within a society based on inheritance and fortune—we’re immersed in the Bennets’ situation, as they face destitution if their daughters don’t marry well.

Even so, Elizabeth (Jennifer Ehle) has the strength of character to refuse insincere and unrequited marriage proposals—“... I had not known you a month before I felt that you were the last man in the world whom I could ever be prevailed on to marry”—and Jane (Susannah Harker) doesn’t simper or flirt to solicit such proposals, which would have benefited their parents.

I’ve seen the 1995 Pride and Prejudice at least four or five times; when I’m home sick, this is what I want to watch all day. So when my 10-year-old daughter recently finished the novel, we simply had to celebrate for six hours with a few fellow Austen fans. One friend brought over her Blu-ray version, and I admit I was skeptical of the difference it would make. I’d been happy watching Elizabeth spar with Mr. Darcy and roll her eyes at her mother (Alison Steadman) in old-school levels of clarity. I was wrong to doubt.

We all commented at various times: “There’s a pattern on his tie!” “I can see the newsprint on the paper he’s reading!” “I never knew there was a floral design on her dress!”

With new eyes, I watched Jane smile softly at Mr. Bingley (Crispin Bonham-Carter) while his snobby sisters (Anna Chancellor and Lucy Robinson) snicker and approve of Mr. Darcy’s effort to break up the innocent lovers. I could see the varying hues of indignant flush on Elizabeth’s cheeks as she turns down Mr. Darcy and later as she stands up to Lady Catherine de Bourgh (Barbara Leigh-Hunt). And the subtle shades of Mr. Darcy’s growing affection for Elizabeth were all the more evident. 

Pride and Prejudice is a timeless gem, the 1995 film reveals its many facets, and the Blu-ray adds a 21st century polish. (six one-hour segments) 

—Andrea Rooks








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