Wednesday, September 22, 2021     Volume: 22, Issue: 29
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Santa Maria Sun / Film

This weeks review
A QUIET PLACE PART II
ANOTHER ROUND
BINGEABLE: 100 FOOT WAVE (2021-)
BINGEABLE: BARRY (2018-)
BINGEABLE: CLICKBAIT
BINGEABLE: FLEABAG (2016-2019)
BINGEABLE: SWEET TOOTH
BINGEABLE: THE WHITE LOTUS
BINGEABLE: TITANS (2018-)
BLACK WIDOW
BLAST FROM THE PAST: CARRIE (1976)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE MATRIX (1999)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: THE PRESTIGE (2006)
BLAST FROM THE PAST: WILD AT HEART (1990)
BOSS LEVEL
CANDYMAN
CRY MACHO
GUILTY PLEASURE: BACHELOR IN PARADISE (2014-)
GUILTY PLEASURES: CHEER (2020)
GUILTY PLEASURES: GUNPOWDER MILKSHAKE
GUILTY PLEASURES: JOLT
HAVE A GOOD TRIP: ADVENTURES IN PSYCHEDELICS
HEARST CASTLE: BUILDING THE DREAM (1996)
I CARE A LOT
I’M THINKING OF ENDING THINGS
IRRESISTIBLE
LIMBO
MISHA AND THE WOLVES (2021)
NEW FLICKS: BLOOD RED SKY
NEW FLICKS: CODA
NEW FLICKS: COPSHOP
NEW FLICKS: CRUELLA
NEW FLICKS: REMINISCENCE
NEW FLICKS: SWEET GIRL
NEW FLICKS: THE SUICIDE SQUAD
NEW FLICKS: VAL (2021)
NINE DAYS
NO SUDDEN MOVE
PIG
ROADRUNNER: A FILM ABOUT ANTHONY BOURDAIN (2021)
SOUL
THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM (2019)
THE LAST BLOCKBUSTER (2020)
THE MAP OF TINY PERFECT THINGS
THE NEW MUTANTS
THE PAPER TIGERS
THE PROFESSOR AND THE MADMAN
THE SUNLIT NIGHT
TV REVIEW: A WILDERNESS OF ERROR (2020)
TV REVIEW: BATES MOTEL
TV REVIEW: DEFENDING JACOB
TV REVIEW: EXTERMINATE ALL THE BRUTES (2021)
TV REVIEW: HELL ON WHEELS (2011-2016)
TV REVIEW: HOMECOMING
TV REVIEW: HOW TO WITH JOHN WILSON
TV REVIEW: I KNOW THIS MUCH IS TRUE
TV REVIEW: I MAY DESTROY YOU
TV REVIEW: LENOX HILL
TV REVIEW: LITTLE AMERICA
TV REVIEW: MARE OF EASTTOWN
TV REVIEW: MRS. AMERICA
TV REVIEW: ONE MISSISSIPPI
TV REVIEW: PAINTING WITH JOHN (2021)
TV REVIEW: RAMY
TV REVIEW: RUN
TV REVIEW: SPACE FORCE
TV REVIEW: TABOO
TV REVIEW: TED LASSO (2020-)
TV REVIEW: THE BOYS
TV REVIEW: THE END OF THE F***ING WORLD
TV REVIEW: THE FLIGHT ATTENDANT
TV REVIEW: THE LAST KINGDOM
TV REVIEW: THE MIDNIGHT GOSPEL
TV REVIEW: THE MOST DANGEROUS ANIMAL OF ALL (2020)
TV REVIEW: THE PLOT AGAINST AMERICA
TV REVIEW: THE QUEEN’S GAMBIT
TV REVIEW: THE VOW
TV REVIEW: TREADSTONE (2019)
TV REVIEW: UNDONE
TV REVIEW: WANDAVISION
TV REVIEW: WARRIOR
TV REVIEW: WHAT WE DO IN THE SHADOWS
TV REVIEW: ZEROZEROZERO
UNDERRATED: BATMAN BEGINS (2005)
UNDERRATED: THE KINGDOM (2007)

BINGEABLE: FLEABAG (2016-2019)

PHOTO BY COURTESY OF TWO BROTHERS PICTURES

BINGEABLE: FLEABAG (2016-2019)


Where is it playing?: Amazon Prime

What's it rated?: TV-MA

User Rating: 7.50 (1 Votes)

Fleabag is the funniest thing on TV right now—a bone-dry British comedy-drama about a selfish, angry, sexually voracious but nameless woman (Phoebe Waller-Bridge), who’s floundering through life. She can’t hold down a relationship, though she strings along her ex-boyfriend, Harry (Hugh Skinner), whenever she needs a booty call—that’s when she’s not shagging one of her other love interests like Arsehole Guy (Ben Aldridge), Bus Rodent (Jamie Demetriou), or the Catholic priest (Andrew Scott) she falls for in Season 2.

Created by Waller-Bridge from her one-woman play she debuted at the 2013 Edinburgh Festival Fringe, the program’s hallmark is the way the lead character breaks the fourth wall, looking directly into the camera and speaking to the audience. Waller-Bridge’s comic timing, facial expressions, and these fourth-wall asides are simply brilliant. They allow her to make a running commentary on her life’s travails, of which there are many.

Much of the drama stems from the lead character’s relationship with her much more successful but just as unhappy sister, Claire (Sian Clifford), and her exasperated father (Bill Paterson) and the sisters’ godmother (Olivia Colman), who took up with their father upon their mother’s death. Claire’s loutish, alcoholic husband, Martin (Brett Gelman), also manages to generate a lot of drama. The family’s dysfunction is spellbinding! The tension between the various characters is pushed below the surface in that most British of ways. Sarcasm has never sounded so polite.

The lead character, let’s just call her Fleabag, runs a small and largely unsuccessful café that she started with her best friend, Boo (Jenny Rainsford), who’s deceased but visits Fleabag in her head, conjured by some guilt Fleabag harbors, which is slowly revealed over the first two seasons. The show plays like a comedy but exposes itself as a tragedy, which helps explain Fleabag’s abhorrent behavior—she’s recovering from a deep psychological trauma.

I’ve come late to this game. The first season’s six episodes aired in 2016, and I didn’t discover the show until recently, upon the release of the second season’s six episodes. With brief 23- to 28-minute run times, I gobbled up the first season one day and the second the next, and I hope there’s more on the horizon and we don’t have to wait three years for them.

This is hilarious, devastating TV, and it’s certainly deserving of its 100 percent Rotten Tomatoes critic score. Laughs are followed by poignant moments, and Waller-Bridge is so charismatic and likable, bringing a deep humanity to her irreverent and broken character. This show bears repeated viewing. (12 episodes) 










Weekly Poll
What are the most important conversations to be having right now when it comes to policing?

We need to address how racial bias influences policing.
We should focus on funding the police so they can do their job.
Mental health is where our dollars need to go, both in and out of the police department.
As one Sept. 20 community input meeting attendee said,

| Poll Results






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