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Santa Maria Sun / Art

The following article was posted on November 20th, 2013, in the Santa Maria Sun - Volume 14, Issue 36 [ Submit a Story ]
The following articles were printed from Santa Maria Sun [santamariasun.com] - Volume 14, Issue 36

Hancock College's newest art exhibit features the works of five skilled students

BY JOE PAYNE


ALL THAT GLITTERS
Artist Jamie Chesnut was experimenting with gold leaf and form drawing while taking Marti Fast’s life drawing class. Several of his pieces are showing as part of “Brought to Life.”
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLAN HANCOCK COLLEGE

Visual art often reveals how difficult it is to draw a person. Subtle asymmetry and minute details become the difference between an accurate rendering and fodder for the wastebasket.

In her life drawing class, Ann Foxworthy Gallery director Marti Fast attempts to lead Allan Hancock College students down the path of good technique for capturing form, including that of Homo sapiens.

“Figure drawing, and drawing the human form, has been a traditional gateway for all artists to prove themselves before they’re considered artists,” Fast said. “All the way back to Leonardo and all those old schools, they did studies from life.”

Subtle things begin to emerge to an artist who sets his eye and brush to a human form—but the basics come first.

“For beginning students, especially, they are learning to perceive shapes of light and dark, and they are trying to get the proportion of the person they are looking at,” Fast said. “Their body may be tall and lanky, or short and squat, male or female, and getting all that visual information down and accurate so it looks good on the page is very difficult.”

Bring yourself
The Ann Foxworthy Gallery features the exhibit “Brought to Life” with studies of the human figure showing through Dec. 8 at the gallery, Allan Hancock College, 800 S. College Drive, Santa Maria. More info: 922-6966, Ext. 3252 or hancockcollege.edu.

Fast has selected five outstanding artists and their work from last semester’s life drawing class to show in the Ann Foxworthy Gallery: Jamie Chesnut, Susan Connors, Garrett Kaida, Teresa Pardini, and Leslie Parsons all have works showing in the exhibit “Brought to Life,” which focuses specifically on the human form.

“I had these five really wonderful students in my life drawing class last semester and I thought, ‘you know, this would be a wonderful group show,’” she said, “and I asked them and they were all delighted.”

Each artist portrays the human form in a very different way. Some of the works will be of the same model. The stylistic differences among the featured artists will be in plain view, providing an intimate look at what the body means to each artist.

“Our bodies are so complex, and the way we balance to hold a pose—that is such a miracle,” Fast said. “So as artists we are trying to capture these invisible forces that are at work from the inside and the outside and make it something we can see.”


EXPLORING THE BODY
Susan Connors’ drawings exploring the body and faces are also included in “Brought to Life.”
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLAN HANCOCK COLLEGE

CRAVING COLOR
Garrett Kaida’s paintings exhibit an attention to detail and highlight stylistic approaches to the human form.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLAN HANCOCK COLLEGE

FORMING AN IDEA
A highly stylized treatment of form can still capture the energy of a subject, as displayed in this piece by Leslie Parsons.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLAN HANCOCK COLLEGE

NAKED TRUTH
A study of the human figure is not complete without a few nudes, like this painting by Teresa Pardini.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ALLAN HANCOCK COLLEGE

Arts Editor Joe Payne tries to live in harmony with both internal and external invisible forces. Contact him at jpayne@santamariasun.com.